Starting 2019 with a Safety Mindset – Hurricanes and Flu Planning

Starting 2019 with a Safety Mindset – Hurricanes and Flu Planning
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Florida being Florida will likely confront at least two seasonal risks during 2019 – hurricanes and flu.1 Those issues are always on ‘the back of’ Floridian’s minds, so they merit a refresher and update (very) early in the year to afford an adequate opportunity to engage in proactive risk management accordingly.

Hurricanes may be a lower risk during 2019

After a rough 2019 (think of Hurricane Michael2), the early 2019 hurricane predictions are tending towards a less ferocious season with fewer named storms.3 That prognostication should not give Floridian’s liberty towards complacency, as the state has unfortunately learned the hard way.

To stay abreast of anticipated Atlantic hurricane trends and predictions, two resources merit attention – the National Hurricane Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Colorado State University’s Department of Atmospheric Science – Tropical Meteorology Project4

This series has provided its readers with information about actions to take both before a hurricane arrives on-shore5and after the damage has occurred.6

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A few (of many proactive and reactive measures) are:

•         Purchasing flood insurance in advance of the hurricane season, because there is a specific waiting period before a policy becomes effective

•         Securing homeowner’s or renter’s insurance policy documents in a water-proof package.

•         Inventorying personal property, heirlooms, mementos, and important documents, including photographs and purchase receipts. Data and backups should be stored off-site.

•         Safely preserving property during a storm.7

•         Promptly filing insurance claims, again including photographs, receipts, and written replacement and repair estimates.

•         Using only properly licensed repair and reconstruction repair contractors.

Let ‘us’ in Florida, then, hope the preliminary predictions are correct, and the upcoming summer-to-fall hurricane season is mild and not wild.

Happy New Year 2019!

Flu outbreaks may be a higher risk during 2019

The same prediction which was made for the 2019 hurricane season apparently cannot be made about the impending flu season. Early and current indicia are that the cold-and-flu season in Florida will be active.8 The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention should be consulted with frequency regarding such matters as outbreak severity, locations, and trends.9 Similarly, regarding the Florida Department of Health for local data.10

Contagious disease proactive and reactive measures are often personal in-nature. Accordingly, flu vaccines, frequent hand washing, and coughing and sneezing into one’s sleeve are recommended. Institutionally, businesses should make plans for short- and longer-term employee absences and redeployments.11 And they should do so nowbefore the situation starts to become disruptive to operations.

Here, then, is wishing to the best of outcomes on all preventable fronts. Cheers!

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1 This column has by no means neglected concerns with red tide and algal blooms. It is just that the topic has been addressed a number of times recently.

3 http://tropicalstormrisk.com/docs/TSRATLForecastDec2019.pdf. For a data-rich analysis see  http://tropicalstormrisk.com/docs/TSRATLForecastDec2019.pdf.

4 By way of disclosure, this writer’s child attends Colorado State University, but not in Department of Atmospheric Science.

7 From close first-hand experience, that is not as easy as it sounds.

8 See http://www.fox13news.com/news/local-news/large-spike-in-flu-and-cold-cases-reported-in-florida, https://www.cdc.gov/flu/spotlights/flu-activity-elevated.htm

9 https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/season/flu-season.htm

10 http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/influenza/

– For more information, call Philip N. Kabler of the Gainesville, FL office of Bogin, Munns & Munns at 352.332.7688, where he practices in the areas of business, banking, real estate, and equine law. He has taught business and real estate law courses at the University of Florida Levin College of Law and Warrington College of Business Administration. And is now the President-Elect of the Eighth Judicial Circuit Bar Association.

Do you have a business matter concerning company formation, contracts, purchase and sale transactions, financing transactions, taxes, human resources, intellectual property, risk management, or lawsuits? If so, please fill out our online Business Questionnaire to receive a free telephone discussion with one of our Central Florida business law attorneys. During this free telephone discussion the attorney will go over your current situation and your legal options.

NOTICE: The article above is not intended to serve as legal advice, and you should not rely on it as such. It is offered only as general information. You should consult with a duly licensed attorney regarding your Florida legal matter, as every situation is unique. Please know that merely reading this article, subscribing to this blog, or otherwise contacting Bogin, Munns & Munns does not establish an attorney-client relationship with our firm. Should you seek legal representation from Bogin, Munns & Munns, any such representation must first be agreed to by the firm and confirmed in a written agreement.

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